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With the recent stories in the media about diesel pollution and how diesel cars will be banned by 2040, it can be confusing to know which route you should go down for your next car. Petrol and diesel have been around for years, they’re popular and trustworthy but with an increasing number of car manufacturers investing in hybrid and electric models. It’s not just about the environment though, deciding which fuel type is best for you can come down to your annual mileage, running costs, monthly payments and practicality. Here we take you through some of the pros and cons of each…

Petrol – the UKs favourite for over 100 years

Pros:

  • Cheaper – usually the cheapest in terms of fuel cost, car buying and repair costs.
  • Smooth drive – tend to have more power and accelerate quicker, they also are a lot less noisy than diesels!
  • Environmental impact – less production of dangerous emissions like nitrogen

Cons:

  • Efficiency – engines use more fuel as they are less efficient
  • Depreciation rate – petrol engines currently lose their value more quickly meaning you would get less money if you chose to re-sell your car.
  • CO2 emissions – petrol engines release more CO2 emissions than other models

Diesel – the best fuel economy?

Pros:

  • Driving experience – usually better at overtaking and have good towing ability
  • Efficiency – diesel engines can use up to 30% less fuel
  • Depreciation – currently lose their value at a slower rate than petrol engines

Cons:

  • High pollution –Gives off harmful pollutants such as nitrous oxide and hydrocarbons
  • Expensive – fuel, servicing and repair costs are all higher than petrol engines
  • Noise levels – diesels tend to be noisier than others

Electric – join the EV revolution

Pros:

  • No emissions – no fuel to burn so no contribution to air pollution
  • Running costs – day to day running costs are significantly lower than petrol or diesel
  • Tax incentive – don’t pay road tax, congestion charges or fuel tax and you can get a government grant to cover part of the payment for your car!

Cons:

  • Charging – not only does charging take time but you also have to find your nearest charging point or have one installed at home which can be quite pricey.
  • Expensive – models tend to be very expensive to buy as they are built with modern technology
  • Limited range – it is argued that 100-mile range is enough for a daily commute but it makes long road trips difficult and could set you back an hour journey time for re-charging.

Hybrid – two engines working as one

Pros:

  • Maintenance – lower maintenance costs as they tend to suffer less wear and tear due to the way they are built
  • Government incentives – just like electric, they are also eligible for government incentives when buying
  • Environmental impact – even though they aren’t 100% emission free, hybrids are much better for the environment than petrol or diesel.

Cons:

  • Expensive to buy – again like electric cars they are expensive to buy, with some of the cheapest being priced at £25,000
  • Long distances – great for a short daily commute but reports have shown they are as fuel efficient as diesels on longer journeys and motorways.
  • Charging – charging takes time if you compare it to a 5-minute petrol or diesel fill up

Maybe you’ll stick to petrol or diesel for the time being. Or you’ve booked an electric test drive to see what all the rage is about. Or you’re already a hybrid lover! Whatever you decide, we hope you found our guide useful!